Scallywag

Only passions, great passions, can elevate the soul to great things.

~ Denis Diderot (1713 - 1784) ~

Do I Really Want to Lose Weight?

April 13th, 2012 ~ Est. reading time: 1 min, 48 secs

Do I really want to lose weight, or do I just want to be more loved?

Ask yourself, “Do I really want to lose weight?” and a whole world of pressure is invoked. “Why of course you do. You have to be attractive. If you don’t lose weight nobody will like you,” and so on.

If you’re feeling a bit bad about it, blame the Ancient Greeks! Yes, their “perfect body” ideal gradually crept into Western thinking and from there it has spread virtually everywhere. Never mind that a mere couple of percent of people actually look like these perfect visions. We are all saddled with this mindset that says, “Don’t ask ‘Do I really want to lose weight?’ It’s your duty to.”

But this striving and pressure for perfection is a deception. The people who love you see you. Your body just happens to be your personal address. Anybody who genuinely cares about us sees through all of our imperfections to cherish the person we are. So relax. Even if you still feel you need to strive for the ideal, realize it’s both a hoax and a thief of happiness. You can’t ask yourself if you want to “lose weight” without it being a value laden trigger for guilt, disappointment, and yet more chocolate.

The thing is, you probably know in your heart that this is true. Yet it’s hard to let go of self-blaming. Besides which every billboard, ad, movie, TV show, and store is continually declaring, “You better shape up (for perfection). Otherwise, you are not good enough.” So, even though you could, in theory, innocently ask yourself, “Do I want to lose weight?” the pressure to fit in is so great, we dread the risk of rejection. Yet, that’s wrong right from the ground up.

So what can you do? How do you keep a healthy self-image that’s balanced and realistic? For starters, own your address. Your physical self is where you live after all, so look after it and treat it with respect. Avoid asking laden questions like, “Do I want to lose weight?” “Am I too fat?” or “Do I look nice?” Let go of the paralyzing habit of over-analyzing your personal address, and accept there’s more to you that’s beautiful than merely where you live. Learn to laugh at perfectionism. It’s a ridiculous dead end; wasting so much loveliness, kindness, and ability. Choose what you like best about yourself and let it shine. Never mind what you lack, always celebrate your best. After all, it’s what happy people everywhere naturally know how to do.

 

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