Scallywag

Make happy those who are near, and those who are far will come.

~ Chinese Proverb ~

Can You Be Happy With Confusion?

December 4th, 2011 ~ Est. reading time: 2 mins, 0 secs

Who can be happy with so much confusion?

Confusion ranks super, super supreme. That’s the truth nobody wants you to know. How can I say that, you ask? Well because when you look behind the scenes of big organizations and little companies, their smooth certainties involve a lot of unsteady juggling.

We can be hoodwinked into thinking high-ranking officials and highly paid CEOs have got everything covered with meticulous order. When really the stability we see is merely a cloak hiding organized chaos. You’d think leaders would be worried. But often they seem to be happy that anything is going at all.  That’s how things are in a great many places. Some would surprise you. Still others would shock you. So, can you be happy with so much confusion?

If you expect everything to run like clockwork then you most definitely cannot be happy with such controlled chaos. Nor, if you insist that all should be as it first appears, will you be happy discovering nearly nothing ever is. Behind the scenes, managers are juggling. Professionals are polishing and pretending, and experts are exaggerating for the sake of maintaining their image.

But, in their defence, if we stop looking critically at what they’re not doing and recognize what they are doing, then we have many excellent reasons to be happy.

The principal who can’t organize himself out of a paper bag without a personal assistant and advisers might just have a deep dedication to the welfare of his pupils. We might be happy to hear the store manager, clueless about conducting successful stock control, could be the firm’s customer relations champion. Just as we’d be happy to know the civil servant with a memory problem might be one of the most hardworking staff in the department.

You’ve seen it in workplaces and experienced it for yourself, haven’t you? It’s the kind of slow-burning bedlam that occurs beneath the calm of outward appearances. The stuff that stressed you to the edge, you may or may not be happy to know, is not the exception. It’s the norm.

This confusion points to something significant. If we dealt in the land of realities we would recognize that confusion is a normal thing and perfection a mere idea.

If we can be happy accepting that fact, we might be less surprised when our car comes with a fault, a salesperson can’t find our item, and our phone bill is wrong…again.

But I figure there is one way to be happy despite this kind of confusion. If we decide to take it all in our stride with an unshakeable sense of personal dignity we can generally cope quite well. But doing that puts the onus on us to adapt. True, confusion will remain regardless. But by choosing to see life with a gracious eye, we can be happy about the way we handle it. Well… mostly!

Feegs

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